SAMBA KIDS

 

  

Free Kids Classes on Samba Drumming and Learn Stilt Walking

 
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Safety:
  A Roda is not always a safe place. In Capoeira Angola your space is petty limited. It is almost impossible to be not enangered when a person in a two-meter-diameter-roda does make a fast kick. For the safety of you and your partner it is recommendable to slow down the game, even if it gets faster in between. And even if you don't care much about the other person you are playing with the rule applies "what goes around, comes around". Play fast and you will get a fast response. Thus, it is sometimes just smarter to play at a slower pace.

Aesthetics:
 Players of Capoeira do regularly state that Capoeira Angola is much more expressive and playful than Regional or Contemporary Capoeira. This would not be possible in a high speed game. The higher the speed of the game the more people (especially beginners and not-so-advanced players) concentrate on not getting hit, hitting the other person and maybe even performing a good game. And the first things dropped would be the playfulness and the individual expressions you can do in a roda. Thus, a too fast game which keeps on staying too fast is often seen as an "ugly game" Angola roda, more because of the lack of grace and mandinga than because of the speed.

Precision:
  Here I will quote my first teacher. During training he liked to tell us "I have you rather doing the movements 3 times right than 30 times wrong". He used to say this when the students sped up in training and started being sloppy with the movements. This does easily apply to a game. The faster a game is the less time you have for precise movements, the sloppier you get. That can lead to accidents involving you and/or your partner. Or, it can just lead to the movements looking short, un complete, ugly. Having time during the game does give you the chance to do your movements right, precise and with grace.

Health: It is indeed healthier to play slow than to play a fast paced game. This does count for the individual game as well as on the long term. Why? The faster the game the higher is the danger that you don't listen exactly what your body tells you. An Au you might go into might be started wrong and risking your back or your limbs. In a fast game the chance to correct this fault is lower than in a slow game. For example: in an Angola game which was a tad too fast a friend of mine did almost cripple himself doing an Au malandro (I think some people call it an Au batido). He had so much speed that his upper arm moved forwards while his hand was planted and his upper body falling backwards – to make it short: for a split of a second his elbow was on the wrong side of the arm… In terms of long term effects of fast playing wearing off of knees and wrists is one of the most prominent Capoeira illnesses. Jumps and rapid stressing these vulnerable body parts do have a bad effect in long term (although: I am talking here out of a mixture of experience and pure logics. I have no statistical or medical data for this. But it would be interesting if somebody would investigate this!). 

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Testimonial
We have been attending the drum classes for children on Saturdays for the past 3 months.  My 4 year old son absolutely loves it.  Mr. Pierre is a wonderful teacher. He has the gift of communicating with the children.  They are captivated by him.  We are so grateful to have learned about this class. I wish we ha started coming sooner.....thank you Casa Samba for giving our family this opportunity!   Denise Woodall- Ruff